Inter with Emme Dun Author of Bully

BullybannerBullyBully is a fast paced legal thriller where “The L Word” meets “Kramer vs Kramer.” Bully begins in the 1980s when courts routinely stripped LGBT parents of their parental rights solely because they were gay. Bully then shifts to the 2000s to explore a typical lesbian relationship wherein Lisa meets Windy and they quickly fall for each other, despite Lisa’s plans for a baby.

Although Lisa and Windy never marry, when Lisa breaks it off because Windy reveals herself to be a deadbeat, Windy files for custody of Lisa’s daughter to fatal effect… Bully explores the legal and emotional issues faced by single parents in the LGBT community and leaves readers asking the question: what rights do parents really have?

It has been said, “In a world without law, you have chaos, oppression and tyranny and everyone doing what is right in their own eyes.” Bully is that story.

Buy on Amazon or read for free with Kindle Unlimited

Interview –

Let’s start out easy. Tell us a little bit about your book.

Bully is a legal thriller about justice in every sense of the word. Its themes are full acceptance, respect for and equality in our choices and decisions as human beings and parents regardless of our sexual orientation, gender, race, or other status.

What inspired you to write this story?

My spouse was sued for forced shared custody of her child and over the 5 years the case wound its way through the legal system, I became acquainted with several mothers in the same situation. In light of my background as a lawyer and gay person, especially since the horrible case of “Bowers v. Hardwick” was the law of the land when I was in law school, I followed these cases with disbelief and incredulity. And even though Obergefell righted many past wrongs, there is still injustice and much work left to do in order to have full equality and acceptance.

What is the main lesson that your book is trying to teach?

I wanted to show that we have come full circle from the very dark Bowers v. Hardwick days, to a time, now, where although we can marry, the courts are back in our homes defining our families for us, irrespective of Obergefell, simply because we are lesbians or gay people. I decided to write Bully to show that as far as we’ve come, we still have a long way to go and to bring attention to the near- absolute power elected judges possess and to encourage everyone to become more engaged in the political process.

Moving on to your writing career, how long have you been writing?

Did you always dream to become an author?

I’ve been writing my entire life, but in more of a technical and professional fashion. And, yes, as someone who expresses herself better in writing, I did always dream of becoming an author.

I’m always curious whether or not authors read the same types of books that they write.

So tell us, what book genres do you love to read? to write?

I love thrillers, mysteries, suspense, time travel, and feel good stories.

What are you reading right now?

A Dog’s Purpose

Have any particular authors inspired you to write? If so, can you name one and what you like about their style?

Yes. I have to name two because their writing has had such a profound impact on me: Diana Gabaldon and John Grisham. Their styles are very different, but both write such engaging stories I just lose myself in them!

Do you have any upcoming projects?

Yes. I’m working through the plotline where “Jenna” is the main protagonist.

Emme Dun has been a lawyer for 23 years working in both the private and public sectors including clerking for a trial court judge. While in law school, Emme served as the president of the LGBT student group and had her student note published in the law journal. Bully is her first novel.

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